Veggie Planet Reveals Eight Great Protein Sources For Vegans and Vegetarians in Mississauga, Brampton, Toronto And The Greater Toronto Area

If you’re contemplating going vegan or vegetarian in Mississauga, Brampton and GTA but worried about possible protein deficiencies in your diet, relax – Veggie Planet got you covered. While proteins are essential for building muscle strength, it’s also true that meat foods do score over plant foods in terms of protein content. Fortunately, there’s ample evidence to show that our nutritional requirements can be met by consuming certain protein rich foods that are purely vegetarian or vegan. But for that to happen, we need to move beyond the conventional veggie pizza or veggie burger. Just as with most other things, we have certain plant-based foods that have a relatively higher protein content. By consuming these vegan and vegetarian foods, we can compensate our body for the potential protein deficiencies that may arise from shunning a non-vegetarian diet.

When you walk into Veggie Planet Indian street food restaurant in Mississauga you will see the superstars of plant-based foods that are rich in protein with excellent taste!

Green Peas:

Who doesn’t love green peas?  A staple side dish on most dining tables, those little, round, pellet-like vegetables are a great combination of style and nutrition. A cup (approximately 240 ml) of cooked green peas serves up as much as 9 grams of protein, which measures up to the nutrition acquired from drinking a cup of cow milk. What’s more, green peas also provide our body with generous quantities of essential minerals such as iron, zinc, copper, phosphorus and magnesium.  Green peas are also strong on B vitamin content. Make a quick detour to your neighborhood Veggieplanet for a delightful taste festival with green peas coupled with kaawa nuggets and kaawa drumstick to see your protein intake zoom!

Soy Milk:

For vegans especially, cow milk is an absolute no-no. But avoiding animal-milk also means depriving ourselves of a vital protein source. Fortunately for us, there’s a solution in the form of soy milk. Derived from soy beans, soy milk is a superb alternative for those of us who want the goodness and taste of milk in our daily diets. A cup of soy milk contains 7 grams of protein and liberal doses of calcium apart from vitamins D and B12. Abundantly available on supermarket shelves, soy milk can either be drunk on its own or used as an ingredient in a variety of Indian drinks and dishes.

Lentils

Lentils are a staple in Indian cuisine and you can literally smell their delicious aroma when you enter an Indian street food restaurant. Lentils are versatile in that they can be added to many a dish, right from soups to salads. A powerhouse of proteins, each cup (approximately 240 ml) of cooked lentils deliver almost 18 grams of protein. They are also high in fiber content and can provide nearly half our daily recommended intake of fiber. Lentils are also rich in folic acid, iron and manganese, anti-oxidants. Lentils also promote the good bacteria in the colon and thus contribute to better digestion and a healthier gut.

Beans and chickpeas

Beans, of all kinds, are high on protein content. So, whether it’s kidney beans, pinto beans or black beans, you can be sure that your protein requirements are taken care of when you’re consuming beans in ample quantities. Similarly, chickpeas are yet another legume-source of proteins for vegans and vegetarian food aficionados. Cooked beans as well as chickpeas deliver as much as 15 grams of protein per cup (approximately 240 ml). These legumes are also brimming with nutrients ranging from folic acid, complex carbs, iron, phosphorus, fiber and many plant compounds. Beans and chickpeas can be cooked in a variety of ways. Indian cuisine is replete with recipes that are awesome in taste and easy to cook.

Nuts and seeds:

The good thing about nuts and seeds is that you don’t have to cook them. You can eat them as is or use them as an ingredient in other dishes. Small in size but big on taste and protein content, nuts and their derivatives are a veritable storehouse of essential nutrients too. Munch a handful of nuts from time to time to time during the course of your day, and ensure your daily dose of fiber, healthy fats, iron, phosphorus, calcium, selenium, vitamins E and B, and antioxidants too. Ideally, you should consume nuts and seeds, raw because roasting or blanching them strips them of their nutritional contents.

Fruits and vegetables:

Contrary to popular belief, not all fruits and vegetables are deficient in protein. There do exist some varieties that are high on protein and can provide us with sufficient quantities of nutrition. Broccoli, asparagus, potatoes, spinach, sweet potatoes, brussels sprouts and artichokes are the different vegetables that you can rely upon to dish out your body’s protein requirements. A cup of any of these cooked vegetables contain about 5 grams of protein.

Similarly, we have fresh fruits and berries that are rich in protein content. For example, bananas, nectarines, guava, mulberry, blackberry, cherimoya contain around 5 grams of protein per serving. Including these fruits and vegetables in your daily diet will help take care of your protein requirements.

In recent times there are also many new and unconventional food sources making their way into Indian cuisines, especially in localities such as Brampton, Missisuaga and the Greater Toronto Area – GTA. Ingredients like tofu, tempeh, edamame, and seitan have made their way from the far-east, and are now a regular choice of vegan and vegetarian food lovers. These foods are high on protein and many a time used as a substitute for meat.

Seitan:

Also known as wheat meat, seitan is made from the principal protein in wheat – gluten. When cooked, its look and texture have an uncanny resemblance to meat. 100 grams of cooked seitan provides about 25 grams of protein, making it the richest source of plant protein. Seitan can be cooked in many ways – sautéed, grilled or pan-fried. It is easily available in health food stores. People with gluten sensitivity should avoid seitan.

Tofu, Edamame, Tempeh:

Derived from soybean which is rich in protein, Tofu, edamame and tempeh are all derived from soybean which is rich in protein. The manufacturing methods differ and so does the taste of each of these soybean products. Tofu is made from bean curds in a process that is similar to the one use for making cheeses, it does not have any distinctive taste and acquires the cooking flavors of the recipe. Similarly, tempeh can also be used in naanza, soups, burgers and other recipes such as the planet special poutine.

Edamame are basically immature soybeans that are sweet to taste with a hint of grass. They must be boiled or steamed before eating them whole or in soups.

Visit Veggie Planet Today

If you’re in Mississauga, Brampton, Etobicoke, and rest of Greater Toronto Area, remember there’s Veggie Planet Naanza waiting for your palate pleasure! Veggie Planet offers convenient online ordering via website (https://veggieplanet.ca) and flexible delivery options, including delivery within a 15-kilometer radius available in Mississauga and GTA.

For in restaurant pickups, Veggie Planet is located at 6985 Davand Dr Unit #1, Mississauga, ON L5T 1Y7 and can be reached at (905) 795-7950 for all vegetarian and vegan restaurant menu items.